VI-39: Teacher Aides

North Sanpete School District
Statement of .............

Board Policy with Guidelines

Policy Number:  VI-39
Effective Date:  12/16/1982
Revised Date:
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Subject:  Teacher Aides

BOARD POLICY
Non instructional aides shall be provided when needed and upon the approval of the Board of Education.

GUIDELINES

  1. Non-instructional service aides are defined as persons who work directly, under supervision, on tasks which are of a routine non-instructional nature. The purpose of hiring these individuals is to free teachers from routine duties to do a better job of teaching.
  2. Aides shall be of good moral character and meet the health qualifications required of teachers. They shall be given initial and in-service training provided by the school system designed to give them an understanding of the place of public education in our democracy; to orient them to the importance of their potential contribution; and to define their relationship to the professional staff.
  3. The teacher remains the diagnostician for learning, the manager of learning experiences, and the decision maker in learning situations.
  4. Aides can assist in many nonprofessional activities, but they cannot relieve professional personnel of their responsibilities for the instructional program, nor can they be used as substitute teachers.
  5. Aides shall be assigned within their interest and ability to perform adequately. They may perform such duties as taking attendance, filing, and keeping routine records; collecting funds and keeping accounts; correcting objective tests and making up lists and charts for the teacher showing pupil performance; supervising playground activities, lunchroom, lavatory periods, quiet activities, etc.; helping children with their clothes and with construction of bulletin boards, displays, projects, etc.; checking out library books and caring for and operating equipment; typing and duplicating, answering the telephone, and running errands, etc.; mending books; making arrangements for field trips; escorting children to the nurse; and listening to add sharing thoughts with children who need to talk to an adult.

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